HDTV antenna stations

September 2, 2016
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Antenna Selection Guide
To find the perfect antenna, first list the which you want to watch. The CEA, Consumer Electronics Association, and NAB, National Association of Broadcasters, created the AntennaWeb to help you with the rest. Free! An example of how it works is presented below.

NOTE that all TV stations are transmitting on different channels now. To avoid confusion, however, the new tuners and converter boxes allow a station to keep its old channel number while automatically switching you to its new RF Channel. Some of the new RF Channels are VHF but most are UHF.

RF Channels on your list numbered less than 14 are VHF. They need a broader antenna than UHF channels; the ones numbered 14 and up. Since HDTV is 91% UHF, you probably won't need to use a broad antenna.

Most need an Indoor Antenna. They work just fine with older TVs using a converter box, and with all new TVs. You'll need to use an Outdoor Antenna if you're more than 15 miles from stations' towers, but most towers are clustered near town and are very powerful.


EXAMPLE...
We'll use a site near Tampa, Florida
Press AntennaWeb.org, then Press
"Click Here to Start, " then Enter the
ZIP Code 33772 and Press "Submit"

A Station Tower Map will appear beside a list, as shown below. The strongest stations are at the top. Record the RF channels, and Antenna Color Codes, of the stations you want to watch. You'll need that information to select the proper . To verify this Map and List, select TVFool.com using the same Zip Code, to get the following.

What's important is to get-a-feel for the distances and directions to desirable stations' towers (under "Dist" and "Azimuth" above). Let's select CBS, ABC, FOX, NBC and PBS Networks, all of which are farther than 15 miles away. We'll need to use an Outdoor Antenna to receive them. Fortunately, station towers are clustered in most cities - East of us in our example.
Source: yourfreedtv.com
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